Amzon Owns Your Ebooks

Anyone who buys Kindle books is giving Amazon the right to steal what they think is their property at any moment Amazon wants. There’s no reason to do it when you can generally get an ePub file without a lot of extra hassle.

According to Martin Bekkelund, a Norwegian Amazon customer identified only as Linn had her Kindle access revoked without warning or explanation. Her account was closed, and her Kindle was remotely wiped. Bekkelund has posted a string of emails that he says were sent to Linn by the company. They are a sort of Kafkaesque dumbshow of bureaucratic non-answering, culminating in the customer service version of “Die in a fire,” to whit, “We wish you luck in locating a retailer better able to meet your needs and will not be able to offer any additional insight or action on these matters,” a comment signed by “Michael Murphy, Executive Customer Relations, Amazon.co.uk.”

When you buy a Kindle book through Amazon, you don’t buy a file. You buy a license to a file that Amazon owns. A license that can be terminated at any moment for any reason.



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