Ghosts by Cesar Aira in NYTBR, Eventually

The Literary Saloon reports that the NYTBR is finally catching on about Cesar Aira. That's good for them.

And while you wait for them to roll out their review of Aira's recently translated Ghosts, be sure not to miss our review of the same.

You can also read our lengthy essay on Aira, covering among other things his place in Argentine literature, his peculiar method of composition, and his literary themes and obsessions.

And you can read our interview with Chris Andrews, where Andrews discusses translating Aira.

More from Conversational Reading:

  1. Ghosts by Cesar Aira Review The Complete Review provides the first review I’ve seen of Ghosts, the newest translation from prodigious Argentine Cesar Aira. It’s a curious little book (as...
  2. Translating Italo I’m surprised more people don’t want to interview literary translators about their work. Translators have to be so incredibly attuned to the nuances of the...
  3. Salvayre in NYTBR Well, I guess it’s something of a victory that a book by Lydie Salvayre gets reviewed in the NYTBR. Unfortunately, the review is pretty blah....
  4. NYTBR Interviewed There is a LOT of food for thought here, where the Lit Saloon responds to an interview with four prominent members of the NYTBR staff....
  5. Vollmann in NYTBR Vollmann’s been tapped by Tanenhaus for a review of Exit A by Anthony Swofford. Vollmann is not pleased. “Imagine my satisfaction,” reads the Scribner publicity...

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