Just Stop

I reviewed David Lipsky’s book about his conversations with David Foster Wallace during the Infinite Jest tour for the LA Times, and I gave it a very meh review, because it was only occasionally insightful or interesting. Although, I will say in Lipsky’s favor that I get the sense that he would have ended the project if Wallace’s survivors and literary estate had asked him to.

And in addition to that, Lipsky did at least have the respect to present the conversations without morphing them into some dramatization of someone who may or may not resemble David Foster Wallace. Because that, it seems, is precisely what the people who are making Lipsky’s book into a movie are doing.

I suppose there’s a possibility that this film is a respectful adaptation of Lipsky’s book, but I really kinda doubt it . . .

“The David Foster Wallace Literary Trust, David’s family, and David’s longtime publisher Little, Brown and Company wish to make it clear that they have no connection with, and neither endorse nor support ‘The End of the Tour.’ This motion picture is loosely based on transcripts from an interview David consented to eighteen years ago for a magazine article about the publication of his novel, ‘Infinite Jest.’ That article was never published and David would never have agreed that those saved transcripts could later be repurposed as the basis of a movie. The Trust was given no advance notice that this production was underway and, in fact, first heard of it when it was publicly announced. For the avoidance of doubt, there is no circumstance under which the David Foster Wallace Literary Trust would have consented to the adaptation of this interview into a motion picture, and we do not consider it an homage.”



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