Recent Pings: The Missing Books, The Surrender

Edwin Turner, aka Biblioklept, did a nice interview with me regarding The Missing Books. In it, I talk about the origins of the project, the different sorts of books that exist in it, whether or not the project if fiction or nonfiction, what makes a missing book “missing,” if I’ve ever stolen a book, and lots more. Here’s a bit:

I was also always interested in books that seemed to push up against the boundaries of the categories. Like The Book of Disquiet by Fernando Pessoa, which I place under the heading of “lost books”—is it really lost, or did Pessoa complete it? Well obviously Pessoa never “finished” it in the sense that most books are finished, but then again, Pessoa’s life project arguably rebuts the whole notion of finished books as we tend to construe them. And also, The Book of Disquiet is arguably a journal of sorts, and are those ever completed? George Steiner also makes an interesting case when he argues for Disquiet as a complete work by telling us that “As Adorno famously said, the finished work is, in our times and climate of anguish, a lie.” So I was also always on the lookout for titles that seem to render these categories less stable, the better to contemplate what they actually mean and whether or not there really is such a thing as a “missing book.”

If you want to read The Missing Books, I’m offering a pretty sweet deal right now: you can get the Latin American Mixtape and The Missing Books for $4.99.

The details of the offer are all right here, or just get it below.

You can also order just The Missing Books—which has been featured in Literary Hub, 3 Quarks Daily, the Los Angeles Review of Books, The Millions, and many others, as well as co-signed on Michiko Kakutani’s Twitter feed. Do that right here:


Kindle ($4.99)

In other news, Eric Karl Anderson, aka The Lonesome Reader, had some nice things to say about The Surrender.

I appreciated that Anderson looked at this book as one about the nature of desire (this was one of my intentions in writing it), and I also liked that he discusses how much I delve into my dialogue with film and books as an integral part of my journey. It’s very important to me that I see art as something that plays a material role in our lives, and I like to take the opportunity to examine that process in writing.

One of the most touching things is the way Esposito describes the evolution of his identity in sync with the theory, literature and films he consumes. He meaningfully enters into a dialogue with those whose ideas feed into his experience helping him to better articulate his own desires. It made me aware of why reading feels like such a vital part of my life and how all the feelings produced from the things I read aren’t just abstract concepts, but things that apply directly to my day to day life. I think this book makes a perfect companion to Maggie Nelson’s “The Argonauts” which I only read recently. Both reflect strikingly on the dynamics of gender in a deeply personal and intelligent way.



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THE SURRENDER

The Surrender is Scott Esposito’s “collection of facts” concerning his lifelong desire to be a woman.


LADY CHATTERLEY'S BROTHER

Two long essays of 10,000 words each on sex in—and out of—literature . . .

The first essay dives in to Nicholson Baker’s “sex trilogy,” explaining just what Baker is up to here and why these books ultimately fail to be as sexy as Baker might wish.

From there the book moves on to the second essay, which explains just why Spaniard Javier Marías does right what Baker does wrong . . .


THE LATIN AMERICAN MIXTAPE

5 essays. 2 interviews.

All in all, over 25,000 words of Latin American literary goodness.

3 never-before-published essays, including “The Digression”—a 4,000-word piece on the most important digression in César Aira’s career.

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