Searching for Sebald

One of the nice things about having this blog is that I get to see what you buy through my Amazon links. (Don’t worry, it’s all completely anonymous.)

And sometimes you buy quite interesting things indeed.

Product Description
W.G. Sebald’s books are sui generis hybrids of fiction, travelogue, autobiography and historical expos , in which a narrator (both Sebald and not Sebald) comments on the quick blossoming of natural wonders and the long deaths that come of human atrocities. All his narratives are punctuated with images–murky photographs, architectural plans, engravings, paintings, newspaper clippings–inserted into the prose without captions and often without obvious connection to the words that surround them. This important volume includes a rare 1993 interview called "’But the written word is not a true document’: A Conversation with W.G. Sebald about Photography and Literature," in which Sebald talks exclusively about his use of photographs. It contains some of Sebald’s most illuminating and poetic remarks about the topic yet. In it, he discusses Barthes, the photograph’s "appeal," the childhood image of Kafka, family photographs, and even images he never used in his writings. In addition, Searching for Sebald positions Sebald within an art-historical tradition that begins with the Surrealists, continues through Joseph Beuys and blossoms in the recent work of Christian Boltanski and Gerhard Richter, and tracks his continuing inspiration to artists such as Tacita Dean and Helen Mirra. An international roster of artists and scholars unpacks the intricacies of his unique method. Seventeen theoretical essays approach Sebald through the multiple filters of art history (Krauss), film studies (Kluge), cultural theory (Benjamin), psychoanalysis (Freud), and especially photographic history and theory (Barthes, Kracauer), and 17 modern and contemporary art projects are read through a Sebaldian filter. If Sebald’s artistic output acts as a touchstone for new critical theory being written on "post-medium" photographic practices, Seaching for Sebald suggests a model for new investigations in the burgeoning field of visual studies.

This book is 600 pages, by the way. Aside from this, I know of:

I’ll toss it out to the group: What else out there among the growing body of Sebald criticism is worth reading?



Recent Posts




Criticism Isn't Free


CR is dedicated to thoughtful, in-depth criticism without regard to what's commercially appealing. It takes tens of hours each month to provide this. Please help make this sort of writing sustainable, either with a subscription or a one-time donation. Thank you!

You could also purchase one of my acclaimed ebooks.





3 Comments

Got Something To Say:

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

On Creaturely Life: Rilke, Benjamin, Sebald by Eric L. Santner and Reading W.G. Sebald: Adventure and Disobedience by Deane Blackler.

Personally, I very much like the slim volume The Anatomist of Melancholy: Essays in Memory of W.G. Sebald, edited by Rüdiger Görner, a collection of uniformly excellent papers given at the University of London’s Institute of Germanic Studies in 2003. Very readable scholarship, essays, and Will Stone’s elegaic poem To Max (For W.G. Sebald). It’s hard to find, but worth looking for. For anyone interested in more information, I did a review of it here http://sebald.wordpress.com/2008/04/15/the-anatomist-of-melancholy/

W. G. Sebald: History, Memory, Trauma (Nov., 2006; ISBN: 3110182742), ed. Scott Denham and Mark McCullough

THE SURRENDER

The Surrender is Veronica Scott Esposito’s “collection of facts” concerning how she embraced her true gender.


LADY CHATTERLEY'S BROTHER

Two long essays of 10,000 words each on sex in—and out of—literature . . .

The first essay dives in to Nicholson Baker’s “sex trilogy,” explaining just what Baker is up to here and why these books ultimately fail to be as sexy as Baker might wish.

From there the book moves on to the second essay, which explains just why Spaniard Javier Marías does right what Baker does wrong . . .


THE LATIN AMERICAN MIXTAPE

5 essays. 2 interviews.

All in all, over 25,000 words of Latin American literary goodness.

3 never-before-published essays, including “The Digression”—a 4,000-word piece on the most important digression in César Aira’s career.

Shop though these links = Support this site

Copyright © 2018. Powered by WordPress & Romangie Theme.