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The Requirements of the Moment

As I mentioned in this post, I’ve decided to spend more time writing ostensibly politically themed pieces, in addition to the pure literature/aesthetics writing that you’ve probably come to expect from me if you follow this site and my writing.

There’s no other way to put it: the historic nature of the recent Presidential election has left no other course than this. This is a time when we all have to make our voices heard to protect the things we love about America, so I’m going to do my part.

As part of this, I’ve inaugurated to fortnightly Lit Hub column about the importance of the humanities during a time like this, and the role that they will play (politcally and otherwise) in these dark years. The first entry in the column is here.

Just in case you’re wondering, this writing doesn’t come out of a vacuum. Way back when I did my undergrad degree, it was a double major in Poli Sci and Economics (I barely studied literature or art at all in university). Questions of governance, economy, civics, society, etc, etc are in my roots, and I have always taken a very keen interest in American and global politics. I read lots of books on these topics every year, I keep up with the news like a minor political junkie, and I’ve always engaged in our government as a citizen.

This is something I’ve taken pains to separate out from my literary writings (although I’m quite opinionated on the subject if you follow me on Twitter), but no more. This is a time when voices in the literary and artistic communities need to come forward to support the values we believe in and ameliorate the harm of divisive politics. I hope you all will be with us.



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