The Strange Library

I don’t really know why, but a new book from Haruki Murakami always seems to have a bit of that wow factor, even though I’ve pretty much had my moment with Murakami’s work. Not that I wouldn’t get to these eventually, just that he’s not really the guy I’m aching to read, and hasn’t been for some time.

Anyway, hot on the heels of Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage comes The Strange Library in December.

“The Strange Library,” which will be published in the United States by Knopf this December, is narrated by a boy who visits a library on his way home from school. An old man takes the boy hostage and forces him to memorize a large number of books. The boy eventually realizes that the man plans to absorb the information he’s memorized by eating his brain. With the help of a strange girl and a man dressed as a sheep, the captive devises an escape plan. (Men dressed as sheep have cropped up in Mr. Murakami’s work before.)

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