The End of Oulipo?

The End of Oulipo? My book (co-authored with Lauren Elkin), published by Zero Books. Available everywhere. Order it from Amazon, or find it in bookstores nationwide. The End of Oulipo

Lady Chatterley’s Brother

Lady Chatterley's Brother. The first ebook in the new TQC Long Essays series, Lady Chatterley's Brothercalled “an exciting new project” by Chad Post of Open Letter and Three Percent. Why can't Nicholson Baker write about sex? And why can Javier Marias? We investigate why porn is a dead end, and why seduction paves the way for the sex writing of the future. Read an excerpt.

Available now from Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and direct from this site:


Translate This Book!

Ever wonder what English is missing? Called "a fascinating Life Perecread" by The New Yorker, Translate This Book! brings together over 40 of the top translators, publishers, and authors to tell us what books need to be published in English. Get it on Kindle.

For low prices on Las Vegas shows visit LasVegas.ShowTickets.com

You Say

  • Gilly: Just finished it, it is an astonishing book.
  • Arielle: The title of the article has a typo!
  • Patrick O'Donnell: Irony abounds: when I clicked to take a quick look at this
  • Richard: That article is ridiculous. I can't even reply, except to sa
  • Andrija F.: And don't forget to add Elfriede Jelinek, my favorite among
  • Richard: If you search for this Chris Roberts, God being on Amazon (y
  • Seamus Duggan: READ MARILYNNE ROBINSON!!!!! No encouragement needed, althou

Group Reads

The Tunnel

Fall Read: The Tunnel by William H. Gass

A group read of the book that either "engenders awe and despair" or "[goads] the reader with obscenity and bigotry," or both. Info here. Buy the book here and support this site.

Naked Singularity

Summer Read: A Naked Singularity by Sergio De La Pava

Fans of Gaddis, Pynchon, DeLillo: A group read of the book that went from Xlibris to the University of Chicago Press. Info here. Buy the book here and support this site.

Life Perec

Life A User's Manual by Georges Perec

Starting March 2011, read the greatest novel from an experimental master. Info here. Buy the book here and support this site.

Last Samurai

Fall Read: The Last Samurai by Helen DeWitt

A group read of one of the '00s most-lauded postmodern novels. Info here. Buy the book here and support this site.

Tale of Genji

The Summer of Genji

Two great online lit magazines team up to read a mammoth court drama, the world's first novel.

Your Face Tomorrow

Your Face This Spring

A 3-month read of Javier Marias' mammoth book Your Face Tomorrow

Shop though these links = Support this site


Ten Memorable Quotes from William Gaddis’ Letters

New Books
Here are ten of my favorite moments from these hugely interesting letters.


Interviews from Conversational Reading

New Books
See this page for interviews with leading authors, translators, publishers, and more.


  • Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay by Elena Ferrante September 16, 2014
    Few novelists have captured the rhythms and flow of life with the veracity of Elena Ferrante in her Neapolitan Novels. Following the friendship between Elena Greco and Lila Cerullo from childhood to old age, the tetralogy spans fifty years; over the course of that time, no emotion is too small, too dark, too banal to be recorded. No expense, so to speak, is […]
  • Trieste by Daša Drndić September 15, 2014
    As Drndić reiterates throughout the novel, “Behind every name there is a story.” And Haya Tedeschi’s story is draped in death. Born to a Jewish family that converted to Catholicism and tacitly supported the Fascists in Italy, Haya was a bystander to the Holocaust. She attended movies while Jews and partisans were transported to concentration camps; she pored […]
  • The Tree With No Name by Drago Jančar September 15, 2014
    At the opening of chapter 87—the first chapter found in The Tree with No Name—Janez Lipnik finds himself up a tree, shoeless, and lost in the Slovenian countryside. He makes his way to a house where he is taken in by a woman teacher who is waiting for her lover, a soldier. It becomes clear we are at the height of World War II. Soon after, we follow Lipnik […]
  • Kjell Askildsen, Selected Stories September 15, 2014
    Here, at the midpoint of his narrative, Bernhard, the affectless and purposeless protagonist of "The Unseen," experiences existential near-emancipation at dusk. This retreat toward obscurity in terse, direct language—thematic and stylistic markers of each work in the collection—comes immediately after Bernhard’s sister mentions her plans to enterta […]
  • Berlin Now by Peter Schneider September 15, 2014
    In his new book of essays, Berlin Now, Peter Schneider reveals himself as a gnarled Cold Warrior who has been stricken with many of the maladies common to his generation. With the specter of Communism exorcized, his new enemy is Islam. The book is a collection of short interlocking pieces introducing Anglophone readers to Berlin; it is not being published in […]
  • Paris by Marcos Giralt Torrente September 15, 2014
    In 1999, Marcos Giralt Torrente’s debut novel, Paris, was awarded the XVII Premio Herralde de Novela prize. Despite his success, it took fourteen years for Giralt’s work to appear in English, with the story collection The End of Love arriving in 2013. Now, this year sees the publication of two more books by Giralt: Paris, translated by Margaret Jull Costa, a […]
  • 10:04 by Ben Lerner September 15, 2014
    “It seemed that the [New Yorker] story—which was in part the result of my dealing with the reception of my novel—had been much more widely received than the novel itself,” says the narrator of Ben Lerner’s second novel, 10:04. Perhaps this narrator is Lerner himself—at one point he describes 10:04, within its own pages, as “neither fiction nor nonfiction but […]
  • Theories of Forgetting by Lance Olsen September 15, 2014
    Lance Olsen’s Theories of Forgetting is a masterful work structured around Robert Smithson’s earthwork “The Spiral Jetty.” Olsen’s novel is comprised of three narrations, written each by a separate member of a family. The husband’s and wife’s texts progress in opposite directions across the book, with each page divided among these two inverted texts; though […]
  • An Interview with Lance Olsen September 15, 2014
    The most substantial may be that innovative fiction knows what it is, that someone like me could define it in any productive way, that innovative fiction might somehow be one thing, or somehow consistent through time and space. None of these is the case. That’s exactly what I find most exciting about writing it, reading it, thinking about it. Innovative fict […]
  • The Ants by Sawako Nakayasu September 15, 2014
    In The Ants, we receive a study of existence through ants. That is, there are ants everywhere, ants substituted in every segment of the landscape, yet their behavior seems to reveal something altogether human. Too human. The ants are crushed and disappointed. They are warm and many. They are involved in gang wars and live inside carrot cake. The unique quali […]

Weekend Content

The Quarterly Conversation: Issue 14

Some items you might have missed:

  • Carter Scholz, writing in the tradition of William Gaddis and Richard Powers:
    • Scholz’s familiarity with his material has led some readers to assume
      he is a disgruntled nuclear physicist. But his background is in science
      fiction, not science, with a record of published shorter works
      stretching back over 30 years (representative samples are collected in
      the 2003 collection The Amount to Carry). He has also collaborated with Glenn Harcourt on the novel Palimpsests (1984) and with Jonathan Lethem on the collection Kafka Americana (1999), a set of re-imaginings of Kafka’s life and works. . . . Scholz shares with Lethem a love of the more speculative genres, and of
      their antecedents (Borges, Calvino, and of course Kafka). With Richard
      Powers
      he shares an enthusiasm for building his works around scientific
      ideas, and with the Don DeLillo of Ratner’s Star he holds in
      common an irrepressible impulse to satirize the scientists responsible
      for them. But he departs from his contemporaries in the way he melds
      his observations of the descendental world of scientific practice with
      a reverent sense of the scientific vocation.
      The result of such a melding is an alternately satirical and
      spiritual book. The harsh skepticism that Scholz the satirist brings to
      weapons science is not unlike the skepticism William Gaddis brings to
      business and law in his novels J R and A Frolic of His Own.
  • Tranquility, favorably compared to Andrzej Stasiuk’s novels:
    • There are certainly other writers who employ nonstop misery (Elfriede
      Jelinek comes to mind), but I think there’s a particular brand of
      humorless brutality to Bartis’s that sets it apart. For one thing, its
      ceaseless ferocity gives it a power, even a certain beauty. It’s not
      written to shock, or merely for the sake of writing in this manner.
  • And my review of essays from Michelle Cliff, carrying the torch of Jamaica Kincaid in things Caribbean, feminist, and postcolonial:
    • Though the essays lack the poem’s packed intensity, they do borrow from its logic; many of them strongly resemble collages, and in their heavy fragmentation meaning is established as a series of inter-referencing elements, not as a linear progression. This is most clearly felt in the piece “Cross-Country: A Documentary in Ten Jump-Cuts.” It begins with Cliff leaving the Tehachapi Loop, a 19th-century engineering marvel outside of Barstow, California, in which a stretch of track brings trains back to the exact point from which they started, only 80 feet higher so they can surmount a hill and continue on their journey. It is a fitting jumping-off point for an essay that rambles around the United States of America and then promptly ends where it began, albeit better for the journey.

Favorite Book Covers of 2008

The Literary Saloon has commentary on the Best Translated Book of 2008 longlist:

Among the striking things about the longlist are, of course the omissions; Chad listed a few honorable mentions yesterday, but more noticeable is the large geographic/linguistic blank areas — most notably Far East Asia. Not a single Chinese, Japanese, or Korean title — indeed, nothing from anywhere in Asia until we hit the Mediterranean ! (I lobbied for Beijing Coma by Ma Jian and Life and Death Are Wearing Me Out by Mo Yan, but practically all these other titles appear to have had considerably stronger support — and, after all, I haven’t even managed to put reviews of either of those fat novels up.)

       Note also: only one Arabic title, and no Russian titles (the Serge is French). One African title.

       On a case-by-case basis much of this can be explained — practically nothing in translation came out of Africa (or sub-continental Asia), the Russian and Japanese selections were arguably relatively weak (though I thought Lala Pipo was worth considering), etc. etc., but it still is fairly striking, if not outright shocking. (Especially from among the Arabic and Chinese titles, I’m surprised more didn’t slip in.)

Tchaikovsky, Souvenir of a Beloved Place

Symphony 3

Piano Concerto (soloist Vladimir Horowitz)

The Threepenny Review, Interpreter of Lives by Javier Marias.

The Threepenny Review, Notes on Sontag by Phillip Lopate, an excerpt from his forthcoming book, Notes on Sontag:

My favorite book of Susan Sontag’s—not necessarily her best book but the one I like best—is Under the Sign of Saturn.
I like it partly because it is free of the aggressive, badgering tone
of her aesthetic polemics, and is instead a fairly unified suite of
sympathetic biographical portraits of male melancholics, her heroes of
the intellect (Paul Goodman, Antonin Artaud, Roland Barthes, Walter
Benjamin, Hans-Jurgen Syberberg, Elias Canetti), with the one gender
exception being Leni Riefenstahl in "Fascinating Fascism," which is not
at all sympathetic but brilliant in other ways. I don’t think it is
incorrect to say that Sontag was essentially male-identified; she wrote
much more sympathetically and readily about men than about women, which
landed her in trouble at times with feminist critics. Nor would I put
it past myself to have liked these biographical essays of luftmenschen so much, partly for the reason that as a male reader I identify more strongly with them.

The Nation, Trilling’s Sandbags: Lionel Trilling’s Critical Essays:

All this may seem puzzling to those for whom Trilling is little more
than a name, especially those who have grown up since his death, in
1975. It may be hard to understand why he was, a couple of generations
ago, one of academia’s most cherished culture heroes, one of the few
saints of modern literary criticism. It may be harder still to make the
case for why Trilling, in his antique, mannered way, might matter now.
But if so, there can be few better places to start than with a
reconsideration of his most celebrated book, The Liberal
Imagination
(first published in 1950), reissued with a brief, deft
introduction by Louis Menand, thought by some to come as near as anyone
can to being Trilling’s successor today.

More from Conversational Reading:

  1. Weekend Content Graphic Notation Arnold Schoenberg The introduction to a recently published translation of writings Kafka made in conjunction with his professional employment: To come to grips...
  2. Weekend Content LRB, Double Thought by Michael Wood, which weighs whether or not Kafka’s office work was a wellspring of his fiction: Where did Kafka learn to...
  3. Weekend Content Joan Miro: “I want to assassinate painting. I intend to destroy, destroy everything that exists in painting. I have utter contempt for painting.” NYRB:...
  4. Weekend Content The Jewish Quarterly, "Irène Némirovsky and the Death of the Critic" by Tadzio Koelb. The rebirth of the author becomes the death of the critic:...
  5. Weekend Content Mark Rothko at the Tate The Labor of Reading in an Age of Ubiquitous Bookselling (d) But what about the data it [i.e. the Kindle]...

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