The End of Oulipo?

The End of Oulipo? My book (co-authored with Lauren Elkin), published by Zero Books. Available everywhere. Order it from Amazon, or find it in bookstores nationwide. The End of Oulipo

Lady Chatterley’s Brother

Lady Chatterley's Brother. The first ebook in the new TQC Long Essays series, Lady Chatterley's Brothercalled “an exciting new project” by Chad Post of Open Letter and Three Percent. Why can't Nicholson Baker write about sex? And why can Javier Marias? We investigate why porn is a dead end, and why seduction paves the way for the sex writing of the future. Read an excerpt.

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Translate This Book!

Ever wonder what English is missing? Called "a fascinating Life Perecread" by The New Yorker, Translate This Book! brings together over 40 of the top translators, publishers, and authors to tell us what books need to be published in English. Get it on Kindle.

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You Say

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  • Bernie: Whoa now, mind your Midwestern readers there...
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Group Reads

The Tunnel

Fall Read: The Tunnel by William H. Gass

A group read of the book that either "engenders awe and despair" or "[goads] the reader with obscenity and bigotry," or both. Info here. Buy the book here and support this site.

Naked Singularity

Summer Read: A Naked Singularity by Sergio De La Pava

Fans of Gaddis, Pynchon, DeLillo: A group read of the book that went from Xlibris to the University of Chicago Press. Info here. Buy the book here and support this site.

Life Perec

Life A User's Manual by Georges Perec

Starting March 2011, read the greatest novel from an experimental master. Info here. Buy the book here and support this site.

Last Samurai

Fall Read: The Last Samurai by Helen DeWitt

A group read of one of the '00s most-lauded postmodern novels. Info here. Buy the book here and support this site.

Tale of Genji

The Summer of Genji

Two great online lit magazines team up to read a mammoth court drama, the world's first novel.

Your Face Tomorrow

Your Face This Spring

A 3-month read of Javier Marias' mammoth book Your Face Tomorrow

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Ten Memorable Quotes from William Gaddis’ Letters

New Books
Here are ten of my favorite moments from these hugely interesting letters.


Interviews from Conversational Reading

New Books
See this page for interviews with leading authors, translators, publishers, and more.


  • Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay by Elena Ferrante September 16, 2014
    Few novelists have captured the rhythms and flow of life with the veracity of Elena Ferrante in her Neapolitan Novels. Following the friendship between Elena Greco and Lila Cerullo from childhood to old age, the tetralogy spans fifty years; over the course of that time, no emotion is too small, too dark, too banal to be recorded. No expense, so to speak, is […]
  • Trieste by Daša Drndić September 15, 2014
    As Drndić reiterates throughout the novel, “Behind every name there is a story.” And Haya Tedeschi’s story is draped in death. Born to a Jewish family that converted to Catholicism and tacitly supported the Fascists in Italy, Haya was a bystander to the Holocaust. She attended movies while Jews and partisans were transported to concentration camps; she pored […]
  • The Tree With No Name by Drago Jančar September 15, 2014
    At the opening of chapter 87—the first chapter found in The Tree with No Name—Janez Lipnik finds himself up a tree, shoeless, and lost in the Slovenian countryside. He makes his way to a house where he is taken in by a woman teacher who is waiting for her lover, a soldier. It becomes clear we are at the height of World War II. Soon after, we follow Lipnik […]
  • Kjell Askildsen, Selected Stories September 15, 2014
    Here, at the midpoint of his narrative, Bernhard, the affectless and purposeless protagonist of "The Unseen," experiences existential near-emancipation at dusk. This retreat toward obscurity in terse, direct language—thematic and stylistic markers of each work in the collection—comes immediately after Bernhard’s sister mentions her plans to enterta […]
  • Berlin Now by Peter Schneider September 15, 2014
    In his new book of essays, Berlin Now, Peter Schneider reveals himself as a gnarled Cold Warrior who has been stricken with many of the maladies common to his generation. With the specter of Communism exorcized, his new enemy is Islam. The book is a collection of short interlocking pieces introducing Anglophone readers to Berlin; it is not being published in […]
  • Paris by Marcos Giralt Torrente September 15, 2014
    In 1999, Marcos Giralt Torrente’s debut novel, Paris, was awarded the XVII Premio Herralde de Novela prize. Despite his success, it took fourteen years for Giralt’s work to appear in English, with the story collection The End of Love arriving in 2013. Now, this year sees the publication of two more books by Giralt: Paris, translated by Margaret Jull Costa, a […]
  • 10:04 by Ben Lerner September 15, 2014
    “It seemed that the [New Yorker] story—which was in part the result of my dealing with the reception of my novel—had been much more widely received than the novel itself,” says the narrator of Ben Lerner’s second novel, 10:04. Perhaps this narrator is Lerner himself—at one point he describes 10:04, within its own pages, as “neither fiction nor nonfiction but […]
  • Theories of Forgetting by Lance Olsen September 15, 2014
    Lance Olsen’s Theories of Forgetting is a masterful work structured around Robert Smithson’s earthwork “The Spiral Jetty.” Olsen’s novel is comprised of three narrations, written each by a separate member of a family. The husband’s and wife’s texts progress in opposite directions across the book, with each page divided among these two inverted texts; though […]
  • An Interview with Lance Olsen September 15, 2014
    The most substantial may be that innovative fiction knows what it is, that someone like me could define it in any productive way, that innovative fiction might somehow be one thing, or somehow consistent through time and space. None of these is the case. That’s exactly what I find most exciting about writing it, reading it, thinking about it. Innovative fict […]
  • The Ants by Sawako Nakayasu September 15, 2014
    In The Ants, we receive a study of existence through ants. That is, there are ants everywhere, ants substituted in every segment of the landscape, yet their behavior seems to reveal something altogether human. Too human. The ants are crushed and disappointed. They are warm and many. They are involved in gang wars and live inside carrot cake. The unique quali […]

YFTS: To Peter Wheeler who may know better

(I’ve asked some of the participants in Your Face This Spring to share some final thoughts about the book to help us wind this project up. First up is Ginny Brewer Pennekamp with some excellent thoughts on the Bond angle to Your Face Tomorrow.)

james bondI began Your Face Tomorrow aware that Javier Marias wrote this book for his heroes–Peter Russell and his father Julian–who taught Marias how to live life but were on the verge of leaving it. Mid-read, John Wooden died, adding a personal shade to this UCLA Bruin’s read. I wondered: what will happen to his teachings? How will the world change? Have we lost a compass on how to make our way in the world?

As I thought about this, I kept coming back to the very big hero looming over Deza’s strange adventure–James Bond. Bond is unequivocally a hero, the best spy ever, the man that saved the world over and over again. Yes, he specialized in incredible violence. Yes, he seduced every woman in his path. But the end justified his means. However, in YFT, James Bond is a hero of the past. The world has changed. MI6 is a different institution. To me, one of the essential themes in this novel is who becomes the James Bond of the modern world, how does he operate and with what responsibilities?

Deza is lured into MI6 by Bond. On the night of his qualification test, Deza finds Fleming’s inscription: “To Peter Wheeler, who may know better” and follows Wheeler where Wheeler followed Fleming, the man who invented Bond. Deza enters MI6 expecting Bond and Fleming’s world but instead is presented with three versions of the modern spy–Tupra, Wheeler, and his own father. Each provides Deza with a different set of choices about his place in the world and his responsibility towards his fellow man.

the spy who loved meTupra is, of course, the most similar to Bond. Like Bond, he is a blunt hammer of justice. He beds multiple women, follows the orders of superiors, keeps quiet about his activities. But unlike Bond, the information Tupra acts on is unclear and sometimes entirely made up. Also unlike Bond, he uses many alias. He is not patriotic–he works for England but also for anyone who pays him. The outcome of Tupra’s work is murky; it’s not clear if he does good or harm. Yet Deza follows Tupra’s lead unquestioningly until Tupra assaults de la Garza in the nightclub, and then we see our first instance of Deza analyzing Tupra’s methods: “You can’t just go around beating people up, killing them.” Deza asks. “But why, according to you, can’t one do that?” Tupra answers [V2 p. 339], seemingly satisfying Deza. After all, like Bond they are attacking a greater evil.

Deza parrots Tupra’s behavior when he returns to Spain, going so far as to check with Tupra before confronting Custardoy. Interestingly enough, in this episode with Custardoy, Deza mimics James Bond in the novel The Spy Who Loved Me, which follows Bond as he defends a woman from a gang of men who threaten to harm her. Deza actually becomes Tupra’s version of the Bond who acts without thinking on the basis of imagined information.

Deza says of the men in Tupra’s video:

. . . perhaps like Perez Nuix, and like Wheeler and Rylands, they don’t hold trials or gather evidence, they simply solve problems or root them out or stop them ever happening or just deal with them. . . . And to guess what will happen if they don’t intervene . . . the sort who make remote decisions for reasons that are barely identifiable to the one who suffers the consequences or is a chance witness, or without waiting for a link of cause and effect to establish itself between actions and motives, still less for any proof that such actions have been committed. Such men and women need no proof . . . they lash out with a saber; indeed on such occasions, they don’t even require the action or events or deeds to have occurred. [V3 p. 361]

In this description, Tupra and his division resemble the America that fabricated the existence of WMDs in Iraq, that increased surveillance on the general public after 9/11, that bullied the world without pausing to make sure that the end goal was just, right or deserved.

Deza initially lumps Wheeler into Tupra’s group because he once worked there, too. But as Deza’s consciousness evolves, he begins to separate Wheeler from the rest of the pack. Like Bond, Wheeler is patriotic, carrying out justified orders of a country in the midst of war, when good and evil are clear. Every mission has a higher purpose towards an end goal. Wheeler explains to Deza:

“Do you imagine that I haven’t committed repugnant acts, things which, if I think about them now or in the future, could perhaps have been avoided? . . . They’re repugnant to me now and will seem more so as time passes, the farther off they get, but they weren’t then.” [V3, p. 512]

Unlike Bond, Wheeler is reluctant to use violence, going as far as to spare a double agent’s life when directly ordered to kill him. He devotes his life to one woman, to study, to the pursuit of truth. This is the Wheeler Fleming knows when he notes he “may know better.” Wheeler’s MI6 was not Bond’s, the methods he used were different. Wheeler distances himself from Tupra’s generation of spy when he says:

“the Americans–who, in part, copied us when it came to subversion techniques and who have reveled in using them ever since (rather clumsily, it must be said)–never learned to apply them as we did, to play it as a game despite the gravity of the situation. Far worse, they didn’t give it up in peacetime.” [V3, p. 475]

In this, Wheeler resembles England’s place in the modern world, led by the American bullies but still thinking of a time when they were in control of the world and presumably were more thoughtful and just.

Wheeler’s distinction between how things were run then and now prompts Deza to resign from the MI6, return to Spain and ultimately follow the example set by his father. Deza Sr. is the complete opposite of Bond and Tupra and prides himself on it:

“But the thing I feel happiest about, Jacobo, is that no one ever died because of something I said or reported. Shooting someone, during a war or in self-defense, is bad, but at least you can go on living and not lose your decency or humanity, not necessarily. However, if someone dies because of something you said or, worse still, invented; if someone dies needlessly because of you; if you could have remained silent and allowed that person to go on living; if you spoke out when you should or could have said nothing and by doing so brought about a death, or several . . .” [V3, p. 401]

Deza, still unaware that he has done exactly what his father condemns, answers:

“That was perhaps how it was before . . . my father still imagines he’s living in a world in which deeds left some trace and which conscience had a voice.” [V3, p. 402]

However, Deza Sr. knows the world has changed. It is only Jaime/Jacobo that has not yet developed a conscience or a voice. Deza Sr. tells Jamie:

“It’s sad watching an era in decline, when one has known other far more intelligent eras. Where’s it going to end?” [V3, p. 398]

British EmpireIn practice, the novel ends with Tupra, the new, corrupted Bond still in charge of keeping the world order. It also ends with Perez Nuix, who becomes Tupra’s successor after Deza deserts the MI6–a spy so out of control that she games the system for her own advantage, sleeps with the enemy without having the courage to look him in the face, finishes without having made any real difference in the world.

According to the book The Man Who Saved Britain by Simon Winder, Bond was invented to give the British the satisfaction that they still controlled the destiny of the world at a time when, for the first time, Britain was no longer the dominant empire. Marias takes this a step further to show us the model of the current spy in this world of fuzzy borders and grey conflicts. We should be responsible for each other. We should rely on facts, we should double check that our actions are just and executed for the right reasons. Deza comes to us this conclusion when he says:

My face will resemble and be assimilated into that of all those men . . . who were once masters of time and who held in their hand the hourglass–in the form of a weapon, in the form of an order–and decided suddenly, without lingering or delaying, to stop time, thus obliging others no loner to desire their own desires and to leave even their own first name behind. I don’t like being linked to those faces.” [V3, p. 374]

Deza chooses to be linked to the face of his father, to not hide from the world but to set a different example for the future. He describes the path of his own journey many times during the course of the novel:

time will see it off, it will be time, time that will cure it–of those who have not yet reached their end and are still groping their way uncertainly forwards or walking lightly with shield and spear, or slowly and wearily with shield all battered and spear blunt and dull, without even realising that we will soon be with them, with those who have been expelled and those who have passed and then . . . then even our sharpest, most sympathetic judgements will be dubbed futile and ingenuous, why did she do that, they will say of you, why so much fuss and why the quickening pulse, why the trembling, why the somersaulting heart; and of me they will say: why did he take those particular steps and why so many? And of us both they will say: why all that conflict and struggle, why did they fight instead of just looking and staying still, why were they unable to meet or to go on seeing each other, and why so much sleep, so many dreams, and why that scratch, my fever, my word, your pain, and all those doubts, all that torment? [V1, p. 185]

Come, come, I was so wrong about you before . . . I just couldn’t see you clearly before. [V3, p. 208]

In the end, as he warned the reader in the very beginning, Deza synthesizes his father and Wheeler’s experience, even tipping his hat a bit to the fictional James Bond:

One should never tell anyone anything or give information or pass on stories or make people remember beings who have never existed or trodden the earth or traversed the world, or who, having done so, are now almost safe in uncertain, one-eyed oblivion. [V1, p. 3]

So Deza throws aside Bond for the men “who may know better” and gives us a new example of how to watch over the world.

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  1. YFTS: Cleaning House I also think that now is an appropriate time to talk about the covers, which, frankly, at first mystified me but now I believe I...
  2. YFTS: The Hardest Part About Fictions Is Not Creating But Maintaining Them A couple of things I wanted to point out from the first 20 or so pages of the segment of Fever and Spear that we're...
  3. YFTS: Margaret Jull Costa Now Joining Us Legendary translator Margaret Jull Costa, who of course translated Your Face Tomorrow, as well as books by Jose Saramago, Fernando Pessoa, Eça de Queiroz, Bernardo...
  4. YFTS: The Redemption of Sympathy In my reading, the point of Deza recalling that awful story his father told him about Ronda--where the fascists baited a man like a bull...
  5. YFTS: A Pestilence: Notes on the Reading for Week 12 I’m excited to have this chance to write a post for Week 12’s reading, and just want to begin by thanking Scott for putting this...

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